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Possibility to unroot after cyanogenmod 7 has been installed


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27 replies to this topic

#1 astroswede

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 08:05 AM

Is it possible to unroot the phone after successfully installing cyanogenmod 7 or does the phone need to stay rooted?

I strongly suspect that the phone is more susceptible to exploits while being rooted.

Edited by astroswede, 30 May 2012 - 08:40 AM.


#2 Darkfleet

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 12:17 PM

If your scared of "hackers" gaining access to your phone via dodgy apps, install a virus protection application like Trend Micro on your phone

#3 astroswede

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 02:29 PM

Is there no one that knows the answer to my question. I.e. if it is possible to run cyanogenmod 7 if you unroot the phone after the installation has been completed?

#4 whiteb0yyy

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 03:14 PM

Why would you want to unroot? please explain. I don't think its possible and even if so it's pointless, might as well go back to using your stock rom

#5 astroswede

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 04:04 PM

The reason that I want to root in the first place is that I want gingerbread (CM7)  instead of stock froyo.  Rooting adds nothing apart from maybe I could use ntp to sync the clock.

The reason why I don't want rooting is that I guess, maybe not correct, that when rooted all applications will run as super user.  That sounds kind of rotten.

#6 whiteb0yyy

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 04:53 PM

View Postastroswede, on 31 May 2012 - 04:04 PM, said:

The reason that I want to root in the first place is that I want gingerbread (CM7)  instead of stock froyo.  Rooting adds nothing apart from maybe I could use ntp to sync the clock.

The reason why I don't want rooting is that I guess, maybe not correct, that when rooted all applications will run as super user.  That sounds kind of rotten.
Well if your not rooted you wont be able to install cyanogenmod, but you can root your stock rom. There's nothing but good things to happen when you'r rooted such as overclocking for more performance, and underclocking for better battery life, wifi tethering(for example, your internet service provider sends you an email saying there shutting the internet down for a week, well enable wifi tethering on your phone then search for the network on your computer and bam your computer is on the internet, and lots more geeky stuff. I couldn't imagine being unrooted, i would have no hair.

#7 astroswede

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 05:27 PM

Well my question is if I can:
1)  root
2)  install cyanogenmod 7
3)  unroot

My phone is not bound to any operator (I would never buy such phone)  so I can already tether as much as I want.

#8 whiteb0yyy

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 06:57 PM

View Postastroswede, on 31 May 2012 - 05:27 PM, said:

Well my question is if I can:
1)  root
2)  install cyanogenmod 7
3)  unroot

My phone is not bound to any operator (I would never buy such phone)  so I can already tether as much as I want.

Oh yea totally all you do is find the "official RUU" for your phone, which should be on your phone manufacturers site. It of course wipes everything out of your phone and returns everything back to the way it was when it got unpackaged from the box.

Edited by gearsh1fter, 31 May 2012 - 06:59 PM.


#9 astroswede

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:28 AM

Is there anybody on this forum that can answer my simple question: Does the phone need to stay rooted after cyanogenmod has been successfully installed in order for cyanogenmod 7 to work?

My main purpose of installing cyanogenmod is to get access to later android versions.

Edited by astroswede, 01 June 2012 - 05:30 AM.


#10 whiteb0yyy

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 05:59 AM

View Postastroswede, on 01 June 2012 - 05:28 AM, said:

Is there anybody on this forum that can answer my simple question: Does the phone need to stay rooted after cyanogenmod has been successfully installed in order for cyanogenmod 7 to work?

My main purpose of installing cyanogenmod is to get access to later android versions.
Yes your phone needs to stay rooted or else just stick with your stock rom. Go ahead and get it over with, you wont regret it, and you will never want an unrooted phone again.

#11 astroswede

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 07:42 AM

OK. Thanks for your answer gearsh1fter.

One last question. Does rooting mean that all applications that execute on the phone will run with root privileges?

I just read on one site that the super user package will give me a popup, where I can accept or deny, when an application requests root privileges. If that is true then I feel that I am on top of the game. Can you confirm that is true?

Edited by astroswede, 01 June 2012 - 07:49 AM.


#12 Panos_dm

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 06:41 PM

I think you can unroot. Use a file explorer like es (free) or root
explorer (paid), navigate to /system/chin and delete su binary.
Then delete superuser from /system/app and reboot. There is an
app which can do that for you too, but I can't recall it now.
I unrooted the stock rom that way, so I am not 100% sure about
cm and it may be best to make a nandroid previous to unrooting. Imo it will work, but you won't be able to use apps like setcpu for overclocking and maybe cwm. Anyway, try it if you feel like it. Finally yes, you can deny the superuser request everytime you get asked, but it's not quite the same as unrooting. Good luck and tell us how it went...

#13 bassmadrigal

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:30 PM

First off... Once you root your phone, no, apps do not run with superuser or root abilities/permissions. Apps have to request that, and a popup will ask you for permission. You can either allow it or deny it. This is done through the superuser app. You can set it to remember your choices for a particular app, otherwise it will ask you every time you open that app.

Second, yes, it is possible to unroot CM following Panos_dm's post, but you essentially remove all abilities to update CM to future releases unless you manually flash them through recovery. You also lose the ability to run any app-based backup utilities. And there might be some embedded features in CM that would no longer work without root, but I don't know.

Either way, since root is not allowed unless you enable it, you would be much better off leaving it on your phone. There really is no security risk behind it as long as you don't blindly allow superuser requests.

#14 astroswede

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 06:56 AM

Thank you all for your answers. I have decided to go with cyanogenmod and leave it rooted.

#15 wakawaka024

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 03:55 PM

Sent from my EVO using Tapatalk 2

Edited by wakawaka024, 03 June 2012 - 03:55 PM.


#16 chrcoluk

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 10:02 PM

View Postastroswede, on 01 June 2012 - 07:42 AM, said:

OK. Thanks for your answer gearsh1fter.

One last question. Does rooting mean that all applications that execute on the phone will run with root privileges?

I just read on one site that the super user package will give me a popup, where I can accept or deny, when an application requests root privileges. If that is true then I feel that I am on top of the game. Can you confirm that is true?

Your initial concerns were on the right track.

Ultimately if an app is exploited then the permissions of the app gives the new malware the same permissions so if eg. the app is root priviledges and it gets exploited then thats bad news.

The good news is this is similiar to what UAC is in windows on that by default you do not open apps as root, only specific apps ask for root permissions and if you leave the superuser app on default settings then you will get a prompt before escalation.  There is obviously the question can this prompt ever be bypassed, maybe but of course nothing is ever 100% bulletproof.  Also if left on defaults there will be a superuser log showing what apps have escalated to root.  Normally no apps accessing the net need to escalate to root, sms apps, multimedia apps, browsers.  Generally its apps that mess with clock speeds, titanium backup and things like root explorer.  It probably also be wise to use droidwall to specifically forbid 3G/wifi access to all rooted apps.  There is also an app where can finetune android permissions for every app, never tried it but I know it exists.  However I wouldnt use an a/v on your phone, they are resource drains and when battery power is the fuel its not a good idea.

#17 Karl_Marx

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Posted 06 June 2012 - 02:20 AM

I would like to add that- as of CM9- it is possible to completely disable root access, without having to modify anything.

From settings, go to "Developer options", then "Root Access", and finally select "Disabled". As has already been mentioned, though, there's no harm in leaving root enabled for apps, since you have to manually grant access to each app. The only real benefit of this option is that you can also prevent root access from ADB (USB connections.) I believe this is disabled by default, but I'm not sure.

#18 bassmadrigal

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Posted 06 June 2012 - 07:03 AM

View Postchrcoluk, on 05 June 2012 - 10:02 PM, said:

There is also an app where can finetune android permissions for every app, never tried it but I know it exists.

No app needed. CM7 has permission control built right in (not sure about CM9 as I don't have a device that can currently run it). You enable it under Settings -> CM Settings -> Application -> Permission Management and then you go to Settings -> Applications -> Manage Applications -> [your app] and then you can modify whatever permissions you want when you scroll down.

#19 poldie

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Posted 07 June 2012 - 11:59 PM

Here's a related observation on the matter, plus the plan from CM9 onwards:

http://www.cyanogenm...ecurity-and-you

#20 chrcoluk

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 11:21 AM

View Postbassmadrigal, on 06 June 2012 - 07:03 AM, said:

No app needed. CM7 has permission control built right in (not sure about CM9 as I don't have a device that can currently run it). You enable it under Settings -> CM Settings -> Application -> Permission Management and then you go to Settings -> Applications -> Manage Applications -> [your app] and then you can modify whatever permissions you want when you scroll down.

good to know.